Workplace

Assembly reneges on civil service pay

Anger and frustration has greeted the latest developments on NICS pay. Already eight months overdue – the pay offer was due to be paid last August – a formal offer was finally received in March 2010. The wait has not been worth it however, as it has amounted to a pay freeze on the max points of all scales.

These points are recognised as the rate for the job as all workers are expected to progress to the max of the pay scales when they have completed enough service. It is also being seen as a freeze on all who are due to retire.

United action to defend compensation scheme

The government is planning to slash thousands of civil service jobs across Britain and Northern Ireland and when they try to do it, they want to be sure that it’s as cheap as possible; that is the reason behind the change to the Civil Service Compensation Scheme (redundancy scheme) which has been undemocratically forced through Parliament.

NIPSA: Effective defence of services needed

On 26 March 2010, NIPSA has organised a special meeting for delegates from across the union as part of its “Public Service Defence Campaign”. This meeting comes at a time of government attacks upon, not only on the pay and conditions of public service workers, but the public service itself. The Finance Minister, Sammy Wilson, has recently announced a massive £365 million cut in the budget of the Northern Ireland Executive.

What will recession mean for women?

Women are not only over-represented in low paid jobs, 40% of working women are working part time against only 6% of men. Most of these jobs are an extension of work which women have traditionally carried out unpaid at home. The ideology of women’s second-class status – which has its roots in the development of class society thousands of years ago – has been adopted and adapted by capitalism to maintain its profits and its rule.

Traffic attendants win reinstatement victory

After sixteen weeks struggle and numerous ups and downs, Belfast’s sacked traffic attendants have finally reached an end to what has been a hugely important dispute for both the workers involved and the wider trade union movement.

The dispute started at the beginning of April when the traffic attendants were sacked for walking out of work on a half day protest against atrocious working conditions.  Their employer, NSL (formerly NCP), initially responded by offering to enter talks about the issues the workers had raised but instead quickly moved to sack the 26 workers accusing them of taking illegal industrial action.