Theory & History

August 1969: The North Erupts

The storm erupted in August 1969. One event lead to an explosion of violence in Derry, Belfast and elsewhere and within days British troops were on the streets. They were to remain there for more than a quarter of a century.

Karl Marx’s ecological socialism is a guide for today’s struggle

Too many socialists, even among those who like to see themselves as revolutionary Marxists, have been sadly late in discovering and understanding the ecological analysis of capitalism’s irreparable metabolic rift with the planet and nature that Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels began working on during the 1800s.

August 1969: Workers stand against the sectarian stream

Events in August 1969 are often considered to mark the start of the Troubles. In an eruption of violence, seven people were killed and 750 injured. 1,500 Catholic and 300 Protestant families were driven from their homes. British troops came on the streets and were to remain there for more […]

Chernobyl: A warning from history

With growing calls, including from some on the left, for nuclear fission to be widely harnessed as a means to shift away from fossil fuels and cut carbon emissions, HBO’s mini-series Chernobyl comes as a timely reminder of the colossal dangers associated with this technology.

How workers ended the First World War

The old lie: dulce et decorum est pro patria mori” – It is sweet and honourable to die for ones country. This is how Wilfred Owen summed up the attitude of a generation sent to war under the illusion that it would be a short and glorious conflict. Owen himself was one of the last killed in a war that saw an estimated 40 million soldiers and civilians die as a bloody stalemate ensued over four years. Both sides only ever managed to advance of couple of kilometres against their respective enemies.